Remember the Alamo?

Last month, when Julián Castro filed the paperwork to run for President, he had to add an accent over the a in Julián by hand. The Federal Election Commission hadn’t planned for a candidate with a Mexican name.

The former Mayor of the Alamo City is the only Latino in the Democratic 2020 Presidential field.

San Antonio is the second largest city in Texas and a predominantly Hispanic American microcosm.

One of the most gallant stands of courage and undying self-sacrifice in the pages of history is the defense of the Alamo and the old Mission remains one of the priceless heritages of Texans.

It was the battle-cry of “Remember the Alamo” that later spurred on the forces of Sam Houston at San Jacinto. Anyone who has ever heard of the brave fight of Colonel Travis and his men is sure to “Remember the Alamo.”

Besieged by Mexican General Antonio de Padua María Severino López de Santa Anna, who had reached Bexar on February 23, 1836, Colonel William Barret Travis, with his force of 182, refused to surrender but elected to fight and die, which was almost certain, for what they thought was right.

As the Battle of the Alamo was in progress, a part of the Texas Army had assembled in Gonzales under the command of Mosely Baker in the latter part of February. From this army, a gallant band of 32 courageous men under the command of George C. Kimble left to join the garrison at the Alamo. Making their way through the enemy lines, these 32 men joined the doomed defenders and perished with them.

Kimble’s pregnant wife was washing clothes in a creek with 2-year old Charles nearby when George announced the plans of the Gonzales Ranging Company to answer Travis’ appeal for aid to the surrounded Alamo garrison in San Antonio. His parting words indicated that he felt he probably would not return.

On February 23, 1836, Kimble was mustered into the Gonzales Ranging Company as a Lieutenant and Commander of the unit. After learning that James Fannin was not going to the Alamo as reinforcements, and that there would likely be no other reinforcements, George Kimble and Albert Martin lead a group of 25 men from Gonzales at 2 pm on Saturday, February 27. The party would number 32 upon its arrival at the Alamo. As they approached the Alamo in the early morning hours of March 1, a rider appeared in front of them and asked, in English, if they wished to go into the fort. When they said yes, he turned and told them to follow him. When one of the men became suspicious, the rider bolted away. The volunteers were afraid they had been discovered and galloped towards the Alamo. In the darkness, the Texians thought this was a party of Mexican soldiers and fired. One man was wounded, and his English curses convinced the defenders to open the gates. These Texian reinforcements were later dubbed the Immortal 32. Kimble died at the Alamo on 6 March 1836. His body was burned with those of the other Texas soldiers. Kimble County Texas is named in his honor.

On March 2, 1836, during the siege of the Alamo, Texas independence was declared. Four days later, the document was signed with the blood shed at the Alamo. It was under such conditions that Travis and his men fought off the much larger force under Santa Anna. It was with the love of liberty in his voice and the courage of the faithful and brave that Travis gave his men the none too cheerful choice of the manner in which they wished to die.

Realizing that no help could be expected from the outside and that Santa Anna would soon take the Alamo, Travis addressed his men, told them that they were fated to die for the cause of liberty and the freedom of Texas. Their only choice was in which way they would make the sacrifice. He outlined three procedures to them: first, rush the enemy, killing a few but being slaughtered themselves in the hand-to-hand fight by the overpowering Mexican force; second, to surrender, which would eventually result in their massacre by the Mexicans, or, third, to remain in the Alamo and defend it until the last man, thus giving the Texas army more time to form and likewise taking a greater toll among the Mexicans.

The third choice was the one taken by the men. Their fate was death and they faced it bravely, asking no quarter and giving none. The siege of the Alamo ended on the dawn of March 6, when its gallant defenders were put to the sword. But it was not an idle sacrifice that men like Travis and Davy Crockett and James Bowie made at the Alamo. It was a sacrifice on the altar of liberty.

Brave men and women still exist in America but their numbers are dwindling as are their followers. Too many leaders today would faint if they nicked themselves shaving their legs.

I will leave you with these quotes by Davy Crockett:
“You may all go to Hell, and I will go to Texas.”
“I would rather be beaten, and be a man, than to be elected and be a little puppy dog.”
“Whenever I had anything and saw a fellow being suffering, I was more anxious to relieve him than to benefit myself.”

Is Gene McVay the only being who remembers?

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